Money lessons from a $50K freelance project


In 2017, I was emerging from a massive burnout.

I was burning through the greater part of my money on alternative treatments. My daughter was as yet a baby. I had to find another project soon or find an everyday line of work. I had guaranteed myself that I wouldn’t find an everyday line of work until my bank account hit $0.

I start reaching out to old colleagues. And I got a gathering.

After going through this miserable year, I kinda didn’t care whether I got this project or accepted a regular position. I multiplied my cost and I said that I would telecommute and visit for gatherings.

They said, YES. I was unable to accept this was happening.

The following are 3 lessons from this project.

#1 Unpopular companies have financial plans

The software they are building was super specialty. Not provocative. And profitable.

There is this obsession among UI/UX originators to work for companies that are popular. It makes sense to me. You get a few bragging rights and instant validity for the following position. However, for reasons unknown, I could do without that. The functioning energy of the organizers and the team was super chill without any affectations.

I would prefer to have that than the tension of popularity.

#2 More significant salary = more trust

No hovering over. You set the standards for how configuration is finished in the project.

You could think the inverse. In the event that they pay you more, they make sure they get the best possible deal by keeping you occupied. Be that as it may, no. I got a lot of opportunity to research and investigate arrangements. I engaged with the originators with their business strategy and shaping the future item.

This project left me with no tolerance for clients that sit on the shared screen with you and advise you to move this to one side and make it greater.

#3 Do a retainer contract

This was not a quick project. The extension was massive, and it was absolutely impossible that I could give a proper project.

In this case, organizing the engagement as a retained contract makes the most sense. A retainer is basically a month to month salary. The in addition to for you will be you get repeating income for a really long time. In the event that you have time, you can chip away at different projects as well. You run the cycle as an external consultant. The in addition to for your client is that they don’t pay health insurance and when the work is done the contract is stopped.

As an independent UI/UX creator, I have found that retainer contracts are one of the keys to building a sustainable pay.

Main concern. Charge more. It’s better for yourself as well as your clients.

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